Q: Mr. Faulkner, what did you start with in Intruder in the Dust? Was it the idea of a single character [...] ?
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Q: Do you think that the southern attitude toward the Negro is the same today [1957] as when you pictured it in your book Intruder in the Dust [the novel was published in 1948, but in another answer Faulkner said it was set in "1935 or 1940"]?
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Q: I’m interested in Intruder in the Dust, too, in the last part there, that Gavin—you have the lawyer uncle in that say that “It would be better if the North, the outsiders, left the South alone to settle its own problems, sins.” Do you still hold that theory, or am I right in thinking that you meant that [...]? . . . Well, I was interested in what then should be the outsiders’ point of view, from outside the South. In worrying about the South, what if the South did not pull itself up by its own bootstraps? They would be worried about the effect upon the rest of the states. . . . Well, he might not be a do-gooder exactly. He—he might be a person worried about the effect upon the country at large, foreign policies or problems that come up out of traditional southern attitudes, and then I wonder whether a Senator [from Oregon, for instance,] would suppose—would do, what position could he take that would be acceptable, that would consist of certain rules and regulations to impose for the whole country.
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Q: Speaking of the character of Gavin Stevens in the book, did you have a real life figure that you based him on?
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