SOURCES FOR CONTEMPORARY FOREIGN AFFAIRS RESEARCH


I. WORLD ORDER WEB PAGE:
http://www.people.virginia.edu/~rjb3v/rjb.html

II. GOVERNMENT DOCUMENTS - ALDERMAN LIBRARY

A. United Nations
1. U.N. Security Council proceedings
2. U.N. General Assembly proceedings
3. U.N. Yearbook
4. U.N. Chronicle

B. United States

1. U.S. Intelligence
a. Foreign Broadcast Information Service
b. Joint Publications Research Service
c. CIA World Factbook

2. U.S. Department of State
a. U.S. Department of State Bulletin (Dispatch)
b. Post Reports
c. Background Notes
d. Geographic Notes

3. President - Weekly Compilation of Presidential Documents

4. U.S. Congress

a. U.S. Congressional Record
b. Committee Hearings
c. Congressional Research Service (Reports made be sought from your congressional representative - *)


III. GENERAL REFERENCE/MICROFILM - ALDERMAN LIBRARY

A. English language newspapers
1. New York Times
2. Washington Post
3. The Times (London)

B. Chronological reference works
1. Facts-on-File
2. Keesing's
3. Europa Yearbook

IV. PERSONAL INTERVIEWS

A. Foreign Embassy staff members - *

B. U.S. State Department Desk officers - *

C. U.S. Congressional staff officers - *

D. Faculty experts from Political Science, Government, History, Area Studies, Law departments of this and other nearby universities (e.g., Georgetown, George Washington, American, Maryland) - *


* - Addresses and telephone numbers available in Alderman reference and government documents



DOSSIER SOURCE MATERIALS CHECKLIST

INSTRUCTIONS:
Your dossier must include materials from at least TEN of the following sources. Of the ten or more source materials included in your dossier, at least ONE must be based on a telephone or in-person interview. All materials must be clearly labeled.



GUIDELINES FOR YOUR SIMULATION'S BRIEFING PAPER/DOCUMENT DOSSIER



I. GENERAL GUIDELINES

A. DUE DATE: Without exception, your research paper/dossier is due in class on the day of your scheduled simulation. After 4:45 PM that day, and for every day thereafter that the assignment is late, one (1) point will be deducted from the paper's twenty-five (25) possible points. The paper constitutes 25 percent of your final grade.

B. STUDENT RESPONSIBILITY: Computer, printer, or floppy disk failures are not acceptable excuses for a late assignment. It is your responsibility to make back-up copies of your computer files, to maintain multiple diskettes, and to print out drafts of your assignment early and often.

C. PAPER LENGTH: Your paper is to be 10 typed pages of text in length (only 250 words per page, 2500 words total - strictly enforced).

D. ENDNOTES, BIBLIOGRAPHY: In addition to your paper's 10 substantive pages, your paper should also feature an endnotes section and a bibliography.

E. FORMAT: You should adhere to a consistent citation format such as Turabian.

1. For guidance on how to cite internet sources, follow the link on the course's web page: http://www.people.virginia.edu/~rjb3v/rjb.html
2. For any cited internet sources, the paper should also include a print-out of the first page of that source and an identification of the internet source's author.

F. CITATION: Endnote citation must be provided for any statistics, dates, direct quotations, or facts that are not commonly known. As already noted, the endnote section of the paper does not count toward the paper's ten substantive pages of text.

G. OUTLINE: The paper must be explicitly outlined.


II. THE EVALUATION OF YOUR PAPER
Your paper assignment will be evaluated on the basis of the following criteria.

A. THE PAPER'S INTRODUCTION
Does an introduction exist? Is it clear? Does the introduction feature an explicit statement of your thesis? Does it include a "discussion progression," that is, an explicit statement of your paper's basic structure/organization scheme?

B. STRUCTURE/ORGANIZATION
Is your paper logically structured? Does it feature subheadings to make explicit its structure? Do its paragraphs begin with topic sentences?

C. ARGUMENT
How compelling an argument does your paper advance? Is the argument clear? Subtle? How well is evidence used to support it? Does it cite relevant sources?

D. USE OF ENGLISH LANGUAGE
Is your paper's tone appropriate? Is your paper grammatically and syntactically sound?

E. FORMAT
Does your paper reflect adequate proofreading?


III. YOUR PAPER'S SUBSTANCE

A. TOWARD WHAT AUDIENCE SHOULD YOUR BRIEFING PAPER BE DIRECTED?
The paper should be written as if it were a secret policy brief prepared solely for the eyes of the simulation participant. For example, if you were playing the role of the Indonesian Foreign Minister at a preparatory conference on the "Protection of the Rainforest," your briefing paper would contain confidential information on such issues as Indonesian policy objectives and negotiating strategy. Accordingly, a substantial gap might well separate the substance of your private paper from that of your public rhetoric at the conference.

B. UPON WHAT SOURCES SHOULD THE BRIEFING PAPER BE BASED?
Among other sources, your paper should draw upon the TEN collected in your dossier.

C. WHAT SPECIFIC ISSUES SHOULD THE BRIEFING PAPER ADDRESS?

(1) RELEVANT BACKGROUND INFORMATION
For example, an Indonesian Foreign Minister's briefing paper for a preparatory conference on the "Protection of the Rainforest" might take note of the following facts: (a) the size of the Indonesian rainforest and its socioeconomic value; (b) previous Indonesian policy on the environment generally, and on rainforests specifically; and (c) the record of prior international efforts to protect the rainforest.

(2) POLICY OBJECTIVES
For example, an Indonesian Foreign Minister's briefing paper might discuss Indonesia's principal foreign and domestic policy goals. These objectives: (a) would likely be accorded different priorities; (b) might not all be compatible with one another; and (c) could include such aims as the maintenance of favorable relations with the United States, sustained economic growth in Indonesia, protection of Indonesia's natural resources, and Indonesian domestic political stability.

(3) NEGOTIATING STRATEGY
(a) Anticipated arguments of other participants in the proceeding. For example, an Indonesian Foreign Minister's briefing paper might discuss the anticipated arguments of: the states of the industrialized world; the states of the developing world; and the states with substantial rainforests.
(b) Areas amenable to compromise and concession For example, an Indonesian Foreign Minister's briefing paper might set out such areas for concession as: the time frame for policy implementation; the amount of required financial support; and the geographic regions to be affected.
(c) Non-negotiable areas For example, an Indonesian Foreign Minister's briefing paper might set out the following policies as unacceptable: a moratorium on Indonesian rainforest harvesting; Indonesian financial contributions to an international fund for rainforest protection.