UNIVERSITY OF VIRGINIA
WOODROW WILSON DEPARTMENT OF GOVERNMENT
AND FOREIGN AFFAIRS
 

GFIR 421 Mr. Robert J. Beck
Spring 1998 Cabell Hall B19A
Cabell 431 rjb3v@Virginia.edu
MW 3:30-4:45 PM 924-3488
wsrv.clas.virginia.edu/~rjb3v/rjb.html

WORLD ORDER

REQUIRED READINGS
Anthony Clark Arend and Robert J. Beck. International Law and the Use of Force: Beyond the U.N. Charter Paradigm. London: Routledge, 1993.
Hedley Bull. The Anarchical Society: A Study of Order in World Politics, 2nd ed. New York: Columbia, 1995.
Foreign Affairs - Custom Anthology. World Order.
Readings on reserve at Clemons Library.

COURSE OBJECTIVES
1. To explore the theory and practice of contemporary international politics.
2. To improve the student's analytical ability and capacity for effective written and oral argument.
3. To improve the student's research skills and familiarity with primary source materials.
4. To provide the student the opportunity to explore the problems of the international system through the use of in-class simulations.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS
1. Attendance at all lectures and simulations.
2. First examination (25 percent). Wednesday, March 18, 1998 at 3:30-4:45PM
3. A document dossier and ten-page briefing paper for the simulation (25 percent).
4. Participation in an in-class simulation (10 percent).
5. Evaluation of colleagues' simulations (5 percent).
6. Second examination (35 percent). 10-page take-home essay due on Wednesday, May 6, 1998 at 5:00 PM.


COURSE OUTLINE

I. INTRODUCTION

January 14 Course Organization and Objectives
 

II. THE NATURE OF ORDER IN WORLD POLITICS

January 19 The Concept of Order and the Evolution of International Society

January 21 International Society and the Maintenance of Order January 26 Order and Justice III. METHODS OF MAINTAINING ORDER IN WORLD POLITICS 

January 28 The Balance of Power

February 2 The Great Powers February 4 International Law February 9 International Organization February 11 Culture, Ideology, and International Morality February 16 LIBRARY RESEARCH DAY

February 18 Diplomacy

IV. PUTATIVE CHALLENGES TO ORDER
 
A. Islam and World Politics 

February 23 Islam and World Order

B. Terrorism

February 25 Terrorism

March 2 SIMULATION # 1 - Responding to Taking of Hostages C. The Use of Force

March 4 The Nature of Use of Force Problems

D. Civil Conflicts

March 16 SIMULATION # 2 - The Creation of a New U.N. Intervention Force

March 18 EXAMINATION # 1 

E. The Changing Structure of the International System 

March 23 The Changed System

March 25 SIMULATION # 3 - Securing U.S. Senate Support for NATO Expansion F. Weapons of mass destruction and the problem of proliferation
 
March 30 Weapons of Mass Destruction in the Post-Cold War April 1 SIMULATION # 4 - Responding to the Threat of WMD G. Global Economic Issues 

April 6 International Trade

April 8 SIMULATION # 5 - Assessing the Outcome of the Fuji-Kodak Dispute H. The Global Environment

April 13 Global environmental issues

April 15 SIMULATION # 6 - Securing U.S. Senate Support for the Kyoto Protocol V. THE PROSPECTS FOR WORLD ORDER 

April 20 The Status of the Contemporary State System

April 22 Alternatives to the Contemporary State System April 27 Reform of the Contemporary State System May 6 EXAMINATION # 2 Take-home exam is due Wednesday at 5:00 PM.