TUFTS UNIVERSITY
DEPARTMENT OF POLITICAL SCIENCE

PS 158A – Summer 1999           Dr. Robert J. Beck
Tuesday, Thursday 4:00-7:30 PM   72 Professors’ Row
Eaton Hall 206               617-627-3489
http://www.people.virginia.edu/~rjb3v/ps158-summer.html    rbeck01@emerald.tufts.edu


INTERNATIONAL LAW

Course Objectives

  1. To teach the essentials of positive international law against the background of the realities of international relations and the normative requirements of international law.
  2. To improve the student's analytical ability and capacity for effective oral presentation through the modified form of the "case method" followed in law schools.


Required Readings

Henkin, L., R. Pugh, O. Schachter & H. Smit, International Law: Cases and Materials, third edition (1993).

Course Requirements and Important Dates

  1. Attendance at all class meetings.
  2. Briefing of cases assigned from casebook.
  3. Midterm examination - Tuesday, June 15, 1999 PM
  4. Final examination - Thursday, July 1, 1999, 4:00-7:30 PM
  5. Thursday, May 27, 1999 - first class meeting

 

Grade

Final grades will be based on the following formula:

  1. Class participation, including briefing of assigned cases - 30 percent
  2. Midterm examination - 35 percent
  3. Final examination - 35 percent

 

I. THE NATURE, SCOPE, AND STATUS OF INTERNATIONAL LAW

A. The Historical and Philosophical Origins of International Law  

Henkin, et al., pp. xxii-xxxi

B. Is International Law "Law?" 

Henkin, et al., pp. 1-50

C. Custom as a Source of International Law 

Henkin, et al., pp. 51-94

D. Treaties, General Principles, and Other Sources 

Henkin, et al., pp. 94-148

E. The Relationship of International Law to Domestic Law 

Henkin, et al., pp. 149-181, 198-240

II. THE SUBJECTS OF INTERNATIONAL LAW

A. Statehood and Recognition 

Henkin, et al., pp. 241-286

B. Non-state Entities and Self-Determination 

Henkin, et al., pp. 294-308, 344-362, 374-394

III. SOVEREIGNTY OVER LAND TERRITORY

A. Land and Territorial Sovereignty 

Henkin, et al., pp. 308-343

IV. INTERNATIONAL AGREEMENTS

A. General Principles and Reservations 

Henkin, et al., pp. 416-426, 431-463

B. Interpretation, Invalidity and Termination 

Henkin, et al., pp. 463-533

V. JURISDICTION

A. General Principles of Jurisdiction 

Henkin, et al., pp. 1046-1067, 1081-1098

B. Conflicts of Jurisdiction 

Henkin, et al., pp. 1098-1108

C. Enforcement Jurisdiction, Extradition, Jurisdiction over the Irregularly Obtained 

Henkin, et al., pp. 1108-1125

VI. IMMUNITY FROM JURISDICTION

A. Diplomatic Immunity 

Henkin, et al., pp. 823-837, 1200-1219

B. Sovereign Immunity 

Henkin, et al., pp. 1126-1200


VII. STATE RESPONSIBILITY

A. State Responsibility for Injury to Aliens 

Henkin, et al., pp. 677-738, 755-758

IX. THE INTERNATIONAL LAW OF CONFLICT MANAGEMENT

A. The Law Regarding the Initiation of Force

Henkin, et al., pp. 868-1018



  • EXAMINATIONS: Students are required to take course examinations at scheduled times. Make-up examinations will be given under two circumstances only: (1) physical illness of student - doctor's excuse required; or (2) death of family member.
  • READING ASSIGNMENTS: Aside from (1) chapter introductions, (2) the cases to be briefed, and (3) the notes that follow those cases, the reading assignments from the Henkin casebook may generally be skimmed.
  • TELEPHONE: The instructor requests that you do not call him at his home. If you have an urgent concern, please send him an e-mail message and/or call the Political Science Department at 617-627-3465.
  • TECHNOLOGY: Computer, printer, or floppy disk failures are not acceptable excuses for a late assignment. Please make back-up copies of your computer files, keep multiple diskettes, and print out your assignment early.




CASES TO BE BRIEFED

Custom as a Source of International Law

Treaties, General Principles, and Other Sources

The Relationship of International Law to Domestic Law

Statehood and Recognition

Non-state Entities and Self-Determination

Land and Territorial Sovereignty

Treaties: General Principles and Reservations

General Principles of Jurisdiction

Conflicts of Jurisdiction

Enforcement Jurisdiction, Extradition, and Jurisdiction over the Irregularly Obtained

Diplomatic Immunity

Sovereign Immunity

State Responsibility for Injury to Aliens