Classics 202
Roman Civilization
The University of Virginia
Spring 2001







Updated 5/iii/01

[Click here to go directly to the Schedule of Readings and Lectures.]

Lectures:
 
T/Th
9:30-10:20
Physics 204
Mr. Hays

Discussion Sections:
F
10:00-10:50
Cabell 123
Mr. Briggs
F
11:00-11:50
Cabell 119
Mr. Hays
F
1:00-1:50
Cabell 324
Mr. Briggs
F
2:00-2:50
Cabell 320
Mr. Briggs

Instructors

Mr. Gregory Hays
Office: 450 Cabell Hall
Office Hours: W 3:30-4:30; TH 11-12
Click here to e-mail
Phone: (92)4-6536
Home Page: <http://www.people.virginia.edu/~bgh2n/>

Mr. Adam Briggs
Office: 428 Cabell Hall
Office Hours: M 2-3; Th. 11-12


Required Textbooks

The following texts are on order at the Campus Bookstore:
 


In addition, there is a course packet (= CP) available at Brillig Books.

Course Requirements
 
Midterm Exam 20%
Final Exam  30%
5 pp paper on Plautus 15%
7-8 pp. paper on Aeneid 20%
Informal Writing/Participation 15%

Electronic Resources

The course web page can be found at:

 http://www.people.virginia.edu/~bgh2n/romanciv.html

... but if you're here you probably know that already.

You may also subscribe to the class discussion list by sending an e-mail message from your home account to <majordomo@virginia.edu> with the following text:

subscribe clas202-romanciv
end
The wording should be exactly as shown, with no extra words, phrases or spellings. The commands must appear on two lines. In response you should receive an introductory message about the list.

Paper Topics

To assist you in planning for the semester, the topics for the two papers are printed below.

Paper #1 (5 pp.)
Due Tuesday, February 20 in lecture

Read Plautus's The Haunted House and analyze it using the approaches we have applied to The Braggart Soldier and Menaechmi in lecture and discussion sections. How does The Haunted House reflect Roman cultural values, e.g. those relating to the role of fathers, or the position of slaves? How does it undermine those values? Would the audience have left the theater questioning their social values, or does the play ultimately reinforce the way the (Roman) world works?


Paper #2 (7-8 pp.)
Due Thursday, April 12 in lecture

Choose an episode from the Aeneid and explicate it as it relates both to Roman culture generally and to the poem. The episode should be brief (between 20-30 lines and a few pages) and relatively self-contained. An example might be the killing of Mezentius (10.1071-1276). From a cultural perspective, the episode offers an example of the father/son relationship and filial pietas so important to the Romans; the figure of the Etruscan tyrant Mezentius recalls other historical or legendary figures. Within the poem the relationship between Mezentius and Lausus echoes other paternal relationships (e.g. Aeneas/Anchises, Evander/Pallas). In addition, the scene establishes Mezentius as a three-dimensional and morally complex character, and foreshadows the killing of Turnus in Book 12.
Exam Format

The midterm and final exams will consist of 1) brief identifications of important names, places and terms; 2) short answers on historical and cultural topics; 3) a section in which you will be asked to identify and interpret important texts or images (taken from Scarre or from the lectures); 4) a brief passage from a work you have not previously read, which you will be asked to read and analyze in light of the issues and material we have covered in the course.

The final examination will be cumulative, i.e. it will cover the entire course.

Informal Writing

At the beginning of each section (except the first and last) you will be expected to submit a one page journal entry (typed or handwritten) in response to the assigned reading for the section. You might, for example, pick out and comment on a particular passage or passages that strike you, reflect on the reading in relation to other aspects of Roman culture or of our own culture, or try to answer one or more of the questions on the syllabus. But these are only suggestions; what you write is up to you. These assignments will not be formally graded, but in conjunction with class participation they will account for 15% of your course grade.

General Policies

Attendance

Lectures: Regular class attendance is essential to success at the University. Although attendance in lecture will not be formally taken, you are expected to attend all lectures. Note that the lectures include material not covered in the reading; previous student evaluations have identified lecture attendance as the single best preparation for the exams.

Sections: Because a successful discussion section depends on full attendance and preparation by all participants, a formal attendance policy will be in effect for discussion sections. Absence for good reason (e.g. illness, family emergency, religious holidays, travel for athletic competition) will count as excused and will not be penalized. To claim an excused absence, you must submit a written, pledged explanation for the absence (in as much detail as you feel is appropriate) to your section leader by the next class meeting (i.e. the following Tuesday). All other absences are unexcused. More than two unexcused absences from section may result in dismissal from the course. Note that attendance at section means not only that you are physically present, but that you have done the reading and submitted the weekly informal writing assignment.

The final exam for this course is on Saturday, May 5. If your travel plans do not permit you to take the exam on this date, you should not enroll in this course.

The drop deadline (Jan. 31) is listed on the syllabus.

Late Papers

All extensions on papers are at the instructor's discretion. However, extensions of up to 48 hours will normally be granted on application, provided you apply before the paper is due. Papers more than 48 hours late or without a formal extension will not normally be accepted.

Workload and Expectations.

As the Student Handbook sagely observes:

"University life is very different from high school and learning is much more independent. The general rule to follow is that for every hour you spend in class you should be spending 2-3 hours outside of class studying and preparing."
Accordingly, we assume you will be spending at least six hours per week studying and preparing for this class. More specifically, we believe an assignment of up to 50-60 pages of reading per class is a reasonable one. (If you disagree, feel free to click here).

Academic Integrity

The normal guidelines of the Honor System apply.  All written work (including exams) is to be pledged and signed. Students are reminded that they are responsible not only for upholding the standards of the University themselves, but for ensuring that other students also uphold those standards. If you have reason to think that an honor violation has occurred, it is your duty to contact an Honor Advisor.
 
 

Schedule of Readings and Lectures







WEEK 1:  OTHER TIMES, OTHER CULTURES

Jan. 18 (Th): Introduction to Roman Civilization

Reading: No reading

Questions:


Jan. 19 (F): Problems of Cultural Analysis

Reading:

Questions: WEEK 2: EARLY ROME

January 23 (T): Early Rome

Reading: Scarre, Atlas, 12-27

Questions:


Jan. 25 (Th): Roman Values

Reading:

Questions: Jan. 26 (F): A Roman Icon

Due: Informal Writing Assignment #1

Reading: Plutarch, "Marcus Cato" (CP)

Questions:


WEEK 3:  ROMAN VALUES

Jan. 30 (T): Roman Families and "The Roman Family"

Reading:

Questions: [Jan. 31 (W): Last Day to Drop an undergraduate A&S course]

Feb. 1 (Th): History & Myth

Reading:

Questions:


Feb. 2 (F): The Rape of Lucretia

Due: Informal Writing Assignment #2

Reading:

Questions:


WEEK 4: IDEAL AND REALITY

Feb. 6 (T): Roman Comedy

Reading:

Questions:


Feb. 8 (Th): Slaves & Masters

Reading:

Questions: Feb. 9 (F): Miles Gloriosus?

Due: Informal Writing Assignment #3

Reading:  Plautus, The Braggart Soldier

Questions:


WEEK 5 POLITICS & THE LATE REPUBLIC

Feb. 13 (T): Politics: Theory and Practice

Reading:

Questions:


Feb. 15 (Th): The Late Republic

Reading:  Scarre, Atlas, 28-35

Questions:


Feb. 16 (F): The Best Defense ...

Due: Informal Writing Assignment #4

Reading:  Cicero, "For L. Murena" (CP)

Questions:


WEEK 6: RELIGION

Feb. 20 (T): The Gods of Rome

Due: Paper #1

Reading:  Ogilvie, "Sacrifice"; "Divination" (CP)

Questions:


Feb. 22 (Th): Religion and Society

Reading:

Questions:


Feb. 23 (F): Analyzing Religion: the Parilia

Due: Informal Writing Assignment #5

Reading:

Questions:


WEEK 7: PAIN & PLEASURE

Feb. 27 (T): Midterm Exam

For details see above.

March 1 (Th): Epicureanism

Reading:  Lucretius, The Way Things Are, Book II

Questions:


March 2 (F): Love and Death

Due: Informal Writing Assignment #6

Reading:

Questions:


WEEK 8: THE AGE OF AUGUSTUS

March 6 (T): Augustus

Reading:  Scarre, Atlas 46-49

Questions:


March 8 (Th): Romans & Greeks

Reading:  Balsdon, "Greeks" (CP)

Questions:


March 9 (F): Writing Workshop

Due: Informal Writing Assignment #7 (on a topic of your choice)

Reading:


---SPRING BREAK---

WEEK 9: VERGIL I

March 20 (T): Vergil and the Aeneid

Reading:

Questions:


March 22 (Th): The Literary Background

Reading:  Vergil, Aeneid II-III

Questions:

March 23 (F): Dido and Aeneas

Due: Informal Writing Assignment #8

Reading:  Vergil, Aeneid IV

Questions:


WEEK 10: VERGIL II

March 27 (T): Aeneas in the Underworld

Reading:  Vergil, Aeneid V-VI

Questions:


March 29 (Th): The Aeneid and History

Reading:  Vergil, Aeneid VII

Questions:


March 30 (F): The Shield of Aeneas

Due: Informal Writing Assignment #9

Reading:

Questions:


WEEK 11: VERGIL III

April 3 (T): Vergil's Gods

Reading:  Vergil, Aeneid IX-X

Questions:


April 5 (Th): The Influence of the Aeneid

Reading:  Vergil, Aeneid XI-XII

Questions:


April 6 (F): Final Judgments

Due: Informal Writing Assignment #10

Reading:  Adam Parry, "The Two Voices of Vergil's Aeneid" (CP)

Questions:


WEEK 12: WOMEN IN LIFE AND LITERATURE

April 10 (T): Roman Women

Reading:

Questions: April 12 (Th): Ovid & Elegy

Due:   Paper #2

Reading:

Questions: April 13 (F): Ovid and Us

Due: Informal Writing Assignment #11

Reading:

Questions: WEEK 13: ROMANS AND BARBARIANS

April 17 (T): The Early and Middle Empire

Reading:  Scarre, Atlas 38-45; 50-87

Questions:


April 19 (Th): Waiting for the Barbarians

Reading:


Questions:


April 20 (F): We Have Met the Barbarian and He is Us

Due: Informal Writing Assignment #12

Reading:  Tacitus, Germania

Questions:


WEEK 14: URBAN LIFE

April 24 (T): The City of Rome

Reading: No Reading

Questions:


April 26 (Th): Baths & Games: That's Entertainment?

Reading:

Questions:


April 27 (F): Stoicism and Empire

Due: Informal Writing Assignment #13

Reading:

Questions:


WEEK 15: CONCLUSIONS

May 1  (T): The Legacy of Rome

Reading: Scarre, Atlas 88-95; 114-121

Questions:

***

May 5  (Sat): FINAL EXAM (2-5 PM)

For details see above.

Click here to return to the Roman Civ. Home Page